The care home/funeral home assessor paradox

If you’ve worked in a care home, you can go on to become a funeral assessor (if the fancy takes you). You don’t need funeral home experience. The care home world and the funeral home world cross-over and are totally related.

If you’ve worked in a funeral home, you can’t go on to become a social care assessor (no matter if the fancy takes you). You do need care home experience. The funeral home world and the care home word are totally different, too different for words.

The funeral comes at the end of care.

You go to your care home, you get your care, you die, you get your funeral.

One leads to the other.

Sure, the nitty gritty is different. You don’t give medication to corpses. You don’t suture closed Aunt Beryl’s mouth to keep her dentures in. There’s no bingo on Wednesday in the mortuary. Shady Pines Retirement Home keeps the heating over 20 the whole year round…

But the care is the same. Whether dead or alive, dressing Beryl is a challenge. Getting to know Beryl, her likes and dislikes, is as important for giving her a good life as a good funeral. The drive inside the learner to go to work, to take on what they face, and hold it to their hearts, is similar if not identical…

In my mind, the only real difference between looking after Beryl in a care home and Beryl in a funeral home is the state of her health.

If Malcolm from Shady Pines can becoming a funeral assessor and assess apprentices over at Forever Together without funeral experience, then I, Tomos James, can surely become a social care assessor without ever working in a care home.

I don’t have the experience.

(I’d go for another funeral assessor role, but there aren’t any.)

Tomos James

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