English – A curse of rules & expectations?

Aren’t rules there to be broken?

Silent letters everywhere – don’t punctuate before a pronoun – skip the third letter when the adjective is a noun dressed in sheep’s clothing…

Okay, I’m just making the above up (mostly), and I’m sure there are people out there who’ll be able to tell me the ‘who’, ‘why’, and ‘what-for’ concerning the complications that afflict our English language, but I do wonder if we’re not just meant throw it all to the wind…

Now Welsh is my first written language, which is pretty simple because it is phonetic to start with, and I discovered upon my first dabbling in (English) stories that not only was my spelling atrocious, my grammar was utterly appalling, and that I couldn’t quite complete a thought let alone a story. My grammar remains appalling, and if it wasn’t for the red squiggly line that pops up (sometimes correctly, most often not – I can’t seem to change from American being ‘default’) my spelling would remain atrocious, unless ‘endoplasmic reticulum’ is needed, but then the more complicated the word the easier I find spelling it, which is odd…

I took English A-Level, and I recall my tutor did often comment that although rather graphic and on point (big head) – my most favourite line of my most favourite story, ‘he crept into the crypt for a crap, and then he crept back out again’ – was littered with errors that did not conform to what was expected.

I don’t really like conforming, and I don’t do great with expectations – those who expect are setting themselves up for a fall – and although I took on board her critique, I’ve ultimately developed as I’ve wanted, discovered my own style, and written the book ‘Frienemy’ as a result of it, and have now started on my series entitled ‘End of Life’.

I figure – and this comes from the chatty way I write – that we should play with English like we play with our food, and enjoy twisting it and breaking its rules.

Some rules you can’t break, though – connectors (I call them connectors) like ‘and’ and ‘the’ need to be included to allow some sense to be gleaned, and I can’t neglect the ‘to’, ‘too’ and ‘twos’ of the world, and the ‘,’ before ‘which’ – but surely word order can be twisted, and can’t ‘poor grammar’ be used to convey more succinctly a point?

I wonder:

Who made up these rules, & who decided we should all conform, ’cause honey, they couldn’t be more wrong…

I’m no advocate for poor English – i quite love our language – but i will advocate the enjoyment found in having a little fun when challenging the ‘norm’…
Tomos James